Resources and Tips

Hi Everyone,
Here are some resources and tips that our family have found helpful. Click here for a 2 page PDF copy.

On-line Resources:

Books: (Phase I)

  • Throwing Starfish Across the Sea: A pocket-sized care package for the loved ones and caregivers of someone with an eating disorder. Written by Charlotte Bevan and Laura Collins. My favorite, played a huge role in moving from phase I to phase II of recovery.
     
  • Brave Girl Eating: A Family’s Struggle with Anorexia by Harriet Brown
     
  • Help Your Teenager Beat An Eating Disorder by James Lock, MD, Ph.D. and Daniel Le Grange, Ph.D.
     
  • Off the Cuff:  Therapist recommended and well received by other SMEDA caregivers. I liked the book and chose not to purchase it because I was already sifting through so many resources, and using strategies. The book can be ordered directly from Duke University at http://www.dukeeatingdisorders.com/#!parent-resource/xspz4
     
  • Finding your Voice Through Creativity:  The art and journaling workbook for disordered eating by Mindy Jacobsen-Levy and Maureen Foy-Tourney. My friend's daughter who had an ED and recovered found this book to be a favorite.
     
  • The Dialectic Behavior Therapy Skills Workbook for Bulimia by Ellen Astrachan-Fletcher and Michael Maslar
     
  • The Secret Language of Eating Disorders byPeggy Claude-Pierre

Books: (Phase II)

  • Why she feels fat by Johanna Marie McShane and Tony Paulson
     
  • Talking to Eating Disorders: Simple Ways to Support Someone with Anorexia, Bulimia, Binge Eating, or Body Image Issues  by Jeanne Albronda Heaton, and Claudia J. Strauss

* Please be very selective about the books and resources your loved one may have access to because they may inadvertently provide strategies for becoming better at hiding their eating disorder and/or engaging in additional self-harm.

Tips & Strategies:

  • Medical doctor who specializes in and/or has a proven track record in the eating disorders community, for working with the age and gender of your loved one.
     
  • Therapist who specializes in the treatment of individuals with anorexia, preferably one with a proven track record in the eating disorders community, for working with the age and gender of your loved one.
     
  • Dietitian who specializes in the treatment of individuals with anorexia, preferably one with a proven track record in the eating disorders community, for working with the age and gender of your loved one. If your dietitian is not providing you with meal plans, specific details regarding options and portion sizes, please seriously consider working with another dietitian. Your insurance company will most likely not cover this, and finding a good dietitian has been critical in our daughter’s recovery process. It was the best $125 we’ve ever spent, and we experienced significant results after one appointment.
     
  • Counseling for self: Seeking this service for yourself may seem like an unnecessary arduous hurdle, especially in the beginning stages of managing an eating disorder diagnosis. The therapy I have received to help me assist our daughter and other family members in understanding the illness and facilitating recovery has been immeasurable, and has played a pivotal role in our daughter’s recovery progress.

YouTube: (short videos)