February Art Hop: Photo Gallery

Mirror, Mirror By Becky Lee   When brainstorming a mirror project, I was experiencing a difficult time accepting compliments and seeing the good in me that others see.  That’s when it came to me.  I decided to reach out to family, friends, students to ask for adjectives they would use to describe me.  I hope to one day look in this mirror, and say and believe each of these things.

Mirror, Mirror

By Becky Lee

 

When brainstorming a mirror project, I was experiencing a difficult time accepting compliments and seeing the good in me that others see.  That’s when it came to me.  I decided to reach out to family, friends, students to ask for adjectives they would use to describe me.  I hope to one day look in this mirror, and say and believe each of these things.

Flowers & Flames By Aubrey Butts

Flowers & Flames

By Aubrey Butts

Untitled The person I was. The person I am today.   by Jenna Losey

Untitled

The person I was.

The person I am today.

 

by Jenna Losey

A NEDA Zentangle by Becky Lee   Two things have become exceptionally important to throughout my journey to recovery – NEDA and art.   NEDA has become an important part of my life. I use the NEDA community in various ways to help me in my own recovery – such as reaching out to NEDA Navigators, raising money for and participating in NEDA walks… I also have the NEDA recovery symbol tattoo - twice.   While I had always been “anti-art”, I discovered different art media that proved to be positive coping techniques. One of my favorites – Zentangles – was introduced to me by Lindsay South. I loved the concept and the creativity I could put into my designs. I often use Zentangling to distract my mind or reroute myself from ED urges.   I created this “NEDA Zentangle” spontaneously one night, and it has become one of my favorite pieces of art. I was able to tie together two very important aspects of my recovery into one product – which I love.    

A NEDA Zentangle

by Becky Lee

 

Two things have become exceptionally important to throughout my journey to recovery – NEDA and art.

 

NEDA has become an important part of my life. I use the NEDA community in various ways to help me in my own recovery – such as reaching out to NEDA Navigators, raising money for and participating in NEDA walks… I also have the NEDA recovery symbol tattoo - twice.

 

While I had always been “anti-art”, I discovered different art media that proved to be positive coping techniques. One of my favorites – Zentangles – was introduced to me by Lindsay South. I loved the concept and the creativity I could put into my designs. I often use Zentangling to distract my mind or reroute myself from ED urges.

 

I created this “NEDA Zentangle” spontaneously one night, and it has become one of my favorite pieces of art. I was able to tie together two very important aspects of my recovery into one product – which I love.

 

 

What about Males?   This question is always asked at any gathering.   Although the ratio of men to women diagnosed with an eating disorder in the US is 1:2, many hypothesize that males may be underdiagnosed.    ED assessments using more female geared language, research focused on girls and women, as well as general difficulties males face for seeking psychological help, are some of the barriers boys and men face in being identified and treated (http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/research-males-and-eating-disorders).  It is not surprising that consciousness among healthcare professionals may follow suit. Interestingly, Mond (2014) found that  men possesses almost as many subclinical behaviors of disordered eating as women; episodes of binge eating, purging, laxative abuse and fasting for weight loss that did not meet criteria for a full blown eating disorder were just about as common among males and females. Men also face different pressures in terms of body image and advertising.  Whereas women’s magazines stress dieting for weight loss, men’s health and fitness magazines promote products, articles and incentives to mold body shape and enhance athletic performance.  Sometimes it is difficult to discern a fact based article from an advertisement.  Products related to building muscles are paired with pictures of six (eight!) pack abs, a lean and mean physique, sculpted biceps, and an overall “ripped” appearance abound.  These increasingly “buff” men are coupled with a fast car, alcohol, and a sexy woman for an ever popular recipe for male success.   Lindsay P. South, MA/LPC Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor

What about Males?

 

This question is always asked at any gathering.   Although the ratio of men to women diagnosed with an eating disorder in the US is 1:2, many hypothesize that males may be underdiagnosed.    ED assessments using more female geared language, research focused on girls and women, as well as general difficulties males face for seeking psychological help, are some of the barriers boys and men face in being identified and treated (http://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/research-males-and-eating-disorders).  It is not surprising that consciousness among healthcare professionals may follow suit.

Interestingly, Mond (2014) found that  men possesses almost as many subclinical behaviors of disordered eating as women; episodes of binge eating, purging, laxative abuse and fasting for weight loss that did not meet criteria for a full blown eating disorder were just about as common among males and females.

Men also face different pressures in terms of body image and advertising.  Whereas women’s magazines stress dieting for weight loss, men’s health and fitness magazines promote products, articles and incentives to mold body shape and enhance athletic performance.  Sometimes it is difficult to discern a fact based article from an advertisement.  Products related to building muscles are paired with pictures of six (eight!) pack abs, a lean and mean physique, sculpted biceps, and an overall “ripped” appearance abound.  These increasingly “buff” men are coupled with a fast car, alcohol, and a sexy woman for an ever popular recipe for male success.

 

Lindsay P. South, MA/LPC
Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor

I had a problem with eating in my life.  That arose only when I had a medical problem that messed up my brain.  I know many people who had eating problems: I've learned to understand the problems and to help those people that I know. This collage has several little "sayings", mostly with pictures, that I have heard over the years.  The sayings are not, at far as I know, from people who have had to struggle with eating and body image, but are similar to sayings from some of these people or their families.  Some may seem crass, but the laughter that many people put into their sayings helps them and their families ­– and shows that laughter, the great medicine, can help people by showing "ED" (the voice that many people with eating problems hear in their heads) that he or she is a jerk who should be laughed at as often as they can.    I hope that this little collage and caption helps people involved with an eating disorder – whether they have one themselves or has a family member or friend who does, or both – kick "ED" out, and help their friends, their family, and themselves.            - Anonymous

I had a problem with eating in my life.  That arose only when I had a medical problem that messed up my brain.  I know many people who had eating problems: I've learned to understand the problems and to help those people that I know.

This collage has several little "sayings", mostly with pictures, that I have heard over the years.  The sayings are not, at far as I know, from people who have had to struggle with eating and body image, but are similar to sayings from some of these people or their families.  Some may seem crass, but the laughter that many people put into their sayings helps them and their families ­– and shows that laughter, the great medicine, can help people by showing "ED" (the voice that many people with eating problems hear in their heads) that he or she is a jerk who should be laughed at as often as they can.   

I hope that this little collage and caption helps people involved with an eating disorder – whether they have one themselves or has a family member or friend who does, or both – kick "ED" out, and help their friends, their family, and themselves.

 

         - Anonymous

Recovery Process: Broken – Put Back Together – Then Whole Again   by Julie Grevenstuk

Recovery Process:

Broken – Put Back Together – Then Whole Again

 

by Julie Grevenstuk

  

  

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This is what my brain goes through when I look in the mirror –

the battle of the mind.

 

by Julie Grevenstuk

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By Anonymous

Reflections

(2 mirrors – 2 views)

By

Lindsay P. South, MA/LPC
Registered Play Therapist

 

 

Pieces of Me

(left mirror)

 

Our reflections in the mirror are mediated by our daily interactions with the advertising, fashion trends, and current images of the body.  Many of these images are conflictual, ambiguous, or just plain unrealistic.  Each picture was taken from a January 2017 fashion or “health” magazine.   And yet, all these images usually don’t help shape a healthy internal dialogue…the words we use to describe ourselves.   The body becomes deconstructed, objectified, sexualized, painted, primed and, now, heavily sculpted.  Part of recovery from almost any form of disordered eating involves grappling with this reflected, fragmented sense of self and the development of a clearer identity.

 

Seeing the Whole

(right mirror)

 

This mirror was much harder for me to make.  I wanted to create a frame that helped the viewer see oneself.  This is so hard for teenage girls and adult women to do!  We need new language to describe ourselves.  The mirror became a piece dedicated to my twin stepdaughters, Stefanie and Emily, who are both now working in the LA fashion industry.  As I cut and pasted, my husband got involved too.  What messages did we want to give the girls, who are now independent, vivacious young women?   I realized the mirror needed to become more than commentary about beauty.  Instead, I created a playful frame that expressed our shared hopes, values and wishes for our children.

Where’s the Fire?  Reflection on the Response Within the Medical Community

by Parent of child who suffered from an eating disorder

Family Table

by Parent of child who suffered from an eating disorder

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(Mask depicting self)

by Anonymous

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(Mask depicting self)

 

by Becky Lee

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(Mask depicting self)

What my brain goes through in a day.

What the outside says.

What the inside says.

by Julie Grevenstuk

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(Mask depicting self)

 What my treatment team says.

What I think when I am encouraged.

by Julie Grevenstuk

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By Trina Weber

 

When My Precious Patient looks into the center mirror, the phrases in the other mirrors are what I see in their reflections.

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by Becky Lee

"This is <was> my scale. (One of the many I have gone through). It is smaller, as it was considered "portable". To ED, it was just easier to hide. It has a "slide out" on the top which contains the window that discloses "the number". 

Covering the scale are negative words and phrases that ED believes and/or says to me, or are a descriptions of what living with an ED is like. If a scale could talk, these are just some of the things it would say. When the slide out is opened, you can see it contains other positive words and phrases that are the actual truth... things I hope to one day believe, without the presence of ED."  

Children’s Aprons

by Jillane

 Canvas and binding stitched with purple thread.  In areas of imperfection a heartbeat or double helix was placed with colorful thread.

Generations to come…love yourself; take care within and be a light in this world.  Nourishment heals to promote growth; grow and hold the world in your hands.  Mind, Body and soul.  Food provides us the ability to make change and face our fears.  Cook; share the wealth for generations to come.

Therapist, LLMSW

 Silverwear

Silverware bent with fire and mallet.

Wear your silverware wherever you go…place it on your pocket, wear it around your neck or put it on a finger; even a money clip… For those of you who just need your own. Xo

 Therapist, LLMSW

 To the World…

 Black permanent marker to touch up imperfections on an old mirror. Write the sentence... To the World YOU may be 1 Person, but to 1 Person YOU may be the World. Acyrlic and Dishsoap to wipe clean following instillation. Red/restrict, Blue/binge, Purple/purge and Red/restrict

Believe it…if you believe in it, it will believe in you. Fake it ‘til you make it… Fight until that distant day; when the World takes you back. Who will save your soul if you will not save your own?  You can be that one person…

Therapist, LLMSW

Recovery Tree

by Anonymous

When your in the grips of your eating disorder, you can’t see a future.  Once you start to conquer your fears, you will see the light at the end of the tunnel.  That in itself is a major accomplishment!  You will start to focus on family, school work, and friends.  In this picture, it shows a once scared and frail girl (me) who finally saw the light at the end of the tunnel.  You can see the light too!