Trina Weber

May 2016 - May 2017 SMEDA Projects and Activities Completed

May 2016-May 2017 SMEDA Projects and Activities Completed

Compiled by

Lindsay P. South, MA/LPC, RPT-S
President, SMEDA

Ø  Development and Design of SMEDA logo

 

Ø  Website Redesign and Launching (Angela Morris and Peter Butts)

o   Blog Posts on topics such as Holiday Eating, Yoga and Eating Disorders

o   PayPal attached

 

Ø  Monthly publication of SMEDA Newsletter (now posted on-line as a blog), coordinated by Laura Smidchens.   Articles on topics such as Dialectical Behavior Therapy for Eating Disorders” and “Men and Eating Disorders” (both by Gary Snapper, LLP/LPC).

 

Ø  SMEDA Facebook Page posts with links to current research on eating disorders (Laura Smidchens & Vinay Reddy, MD)

 

Ø  Parent Support Group Reconceived into face to face parent meetings, online and telephone support and Parent Mentorship program (Angie Morris, Community Board Member and parent)

 

Ø  Free Monthly Support Group meeting for adults struggling with ED (Trina Weber, RD).  Approximately 7 adults attend regularly.

 

Ø  Dewpoint, support groups for adolescent girls and women with eating disorders at Well of Grace Ministries, Stevensville, MI (Flori Mejeur, SMEDA Lakeshore)

 

Ø  Outreach to local K-12 schools:  classroom presentations on Intuitive Eating, Eating Disorders Prevention, and What to Do if you Suspect Someone Might Have an ED (Moorsbridge Elementary, West Middle School and Portage Northern High School) (Trina Weber, RD)

 

Ø  October 2016 Co-sponsorship of and participation in St. Joseph Mercy annual eating disorders conference

o   Discounted rates for SMEDA members to attend @ $25 a person.

o   Info on SMEDA presented at table

o   (Trina Weber, RD, Deb Frisk, RD, Kris Gibson, MD, Lindsay South, MA, Sheryl Lowzowski-Sullivan, PhD, Cathy Cook, LLPC) SMEDA Professionals and 1 community board member (Angie Morris) attended.

 

Ø  Art Hop- Friday, February 2, 2017 at WMU’s Homer Stryker School of Medicine (Laura Smidchens)

 

Ø  Coffee Tasting Fundraiser-Saturday, February 11, 2017 ( 5 Coffee Roasters and at least 8 Companies involved)(Angie Morris, parent)  Profit:  $2,407.77

 

Ø  Public Speaking and Outreach:

 

1)      Brief presentation at Rambling Road Pediatrics clinical staff meeting -August 2016, (Lindsay South, LPC) this led to cultivation of new relationships with Dr. Dodich and Dr. Dobson, two female pediatricians at Rambling Road Peds.

2)      Panel Presentation to Dietetics Association in Battle Creek-September 27, 2016 (  Jillane Mofitt-Bernacki, LMSW, Danielle Seabold, parent/community board member)

3)      Presentation at Grace Health, Battle Creek on “Food Relationships and Identification of Disordered Eating Behaviors” during the monthly behavioral health staff meeting, February 17 , 2017 (Cathy Cook, LLPC, TLLP, RD)

4)      Lunch and Learning presentation to Potawatomi Reservation, March 15, 2017. ( Jillane Mofitt-Biernacki, LLMSW, Danielle Seabold, parent SMEDA board member)

5)      Article on the problems associated with dieting, (Title?), February 2017 Good News Gazette

6)      Article on eating disorders, “When Dieting turns into a Disorder,” South Haven Tribune, February 8, 2017. (Interview with Kristin Fiore, SMEDA Community Board Member and Susan Katz-Scheinker, RD, Flori Mejeur, LMSW)

7)      Radio interview with Lori Moore during Eating Disorders Awareness Week,  February 2017(Kris Gibson, MD and Angie Morris, parent)

8)      Panel Discussion at WMU after “Food Prisons,” a play about ED (Trina Weber, RD and Kris Gibson, MD)

9)      TV interview about eating disorders, February 2017 (Kristin Fiore, Community member/Down Dog Yoga)

10)   Panel Discussion on eating disorders, Kalamazoo College.  (Kris Gibson, MD, Deb Frisk, RD and Jillane Mofitt-Biernacki, LLMSW)

11)   Meetings with local representatives in Lansing to spread awareness for eating disorders. Representative Hoadley read a resolution on the House floor to support eating disorder awareness at 11:36 a.m. , February 22, 2017 (Jillane Mofitt-Biernacki, L LMSW and dietetic students)

12)   SMEDA Lakeshore mailed out over 100 letters to medical practices, counseling offices, and school counseling centers in Berrien County to raise awareness about ED and highlight SMEDA as a resource (March 2017, Flori Mejeur, Abby Black, RD)

13)   On March 28, 2017 SMEDA Lakeshore highlighted a presentation by Dr. Stephanie Style at Lakeland Regional Center.  The presentation was live streamed and was watched by over 600 people.  SMEDA members were present and offered resources and referral information.

14)   Guest Lecture, Introduction to Eating Disorder at WMU for Amy Getman’s undergraduate dietician course. March 13, 2017 (Danielle Seabold, parent SMEDA board member)

15)   Presentation at DeVos Children’s Hospital Conference entitled, “Adolescent Eating Disorders:  Early Detection and Treatment,” an Eating Disorders Interprofessional Teaching Event for third year medical students, undergraduate nursing students, Masters level dietician students and psychology PhD candidates, April 26, 2017.  Kristine Gibson, MD, WMU Stryker School of Medicine.

16)   Panel representation in Kalamazoo College’s Abnormal Psychology class discussion on eating disorders, May 24, 2017 (Jillane Moffit-Biernacki, LLMSW)

 

 

Ø  Monthly Case Presentations on eating disorders at SMEDA general meetings (Gary Snapper, LLP/LLP, Lindsay South, LPC, Trina Weber, RD, Cathy Cook, LLPC, TLLP, RD)

 

Ø  Topical Presentations for SMEDA general meetings:  “How to Cope with Therapy Interfering Behaviors” and “Evidence Based Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder” (Gary Snapper, LLP/LPC)

 

Ø  Conference for professionals on Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse coordinated with Castlewood Treatment Center, St. Louis in planning stages for Fall 2017 (Gary Snapper, LLP/LPC)

 

Ø  Formation of SMEDA’s Instagram Group, a new commitment to reaching young people about eating disorders.  First meeting:  Saturday, May 20.  Sawalls Health Food, second floor restaurant. (Angie Morris and Emily Marre)

 

Back to Basics: Eating 101

This month’s article was written by Trina Weber, MS, RD, an active SMEDA Board member.  She is a registered dietitian who specializes in the awareness, prevention, and treatment of eating disorders. She owns a private practice in Kalamazoo.

 Back to Basics: Eating 101

     Many in our society are afraid of food. There are numerous ways to eat – low-carb, gluten-free, lactose-free, Paleo, or raw vegan, to name a few. Some have genuine food allergies and sensitivities, but too many people cut out whole food groups because they are led to believe the popular myth that it's “better for you”.  If a plate containing a ham and cheese sandwich with lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise, an apple, and some carrots was placed in front of most people, I wonder who would eat it? Some would ask: Is the produce organic? Did the ham come from a free-range pig? Can I get this on gluten-free bread?

      Grocery stores don't make it any easier. There are so many choices between brand names, organic vs. non-organic, flavors, and cost that it easily becomes overwhelming. I reviewed pasta sauces at my local grocery store. There were nine different brands to choose from, and each brand had between 3 to 6 different flavors to choose from. That's almost 50 choices for just ONE food! I assume most of us buy several food items when we're grocery shopping.

      So what do we do? We have to decide what is important and what is reasonable. If heart disease runs in your family, watch the sodium and saturated fat intake. If cancer runs in your family, eat a larger proportion of organic foods. If finances are tight, do the best you can with what you have. Be watchful that you are not cutting out too many food groups, decreasing variety, or becoming too rigid with food. If you want to be a vegan, aim for about 80% of your intake to be plant-based, but be open to animal products for the other 20%. Most of us get invited to parties and other social events that provide little to no vegan foods. Choose not to be so rigid that you “have to” bring only your own food, go hungry at the party because there is nothing you “can” eat, or, the worst decision of all, miss out on a fun social opportunity because there won't be any foods there you're willing to eat.

      Choose not to micromanage your food. Stay focused on the big picture, which is choosing moderation, balance, and variety to ensure you get the best nutrition for optimal body function. (Notice I didn't mention weight?) We're all a work-in-progress, and do our best given our circumstances each day. Don't worry - if you feel like you “messed up” at a meal, you'll have another meal opportunity in a few short hours.