art therapy

ART HOP Series: Food Play

The Art Hop exhibit countdown:  2 days left

Art Hop                                                                                                                                 February 3, 2017 5pm to 8pm                                                                                                             300 Portage Street (WMU Homer Stryker M.D. School of Medicine)

The exhibit is designed to not only share pieces that promote an emotional response and bring insight into what it is like to live with and recover from an eating disorder, but also to provide a greater understanding on treatment and how health care providers and parents play a role in the recovery process.  As part of that educational component...

 

Lindsay P. South, MA/LPC, an active SMEDA Board Member and a Registered Play Therapist-Supervisor, has written this explanation about how food play can be used to help children with an eating disorder.  Her piece will be displayed at the exhibit along with food play examples.  http://www.southwestmichiganeatingdisorders.org/directory/

FOOD PLAY

      Children struggling with eating disorders are often terrified of eating.  Certain foods are especially scary.  An essential part of recovery involves reclaiming all those foods which were lost and rigidly categorized as “unhealthy,”  “bad,” or “off limits.”  A nutritionist plays a key role in food restoration.  Parents and children work together to reintegrate all these eliminated foods.  This is a painful and lengthy process!

      As a therapist, I have found a playful way to handle these aversive foods:  we make and shape miniaturized play food out of brightly colored Sculpey.  The child gets to choose what challenging food to make.  Creating ice cream cones, peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, cookies, pizza and root beer floats helps kids make friends with foods they once enjoyed.

 

Art Therapy: Beyond the Therapist's Office

by Laura Smidchens

Art therapy is not only a way for the individual to communicate with the therapist and gain greater insight during a supervised session. It also helps individuals build skills to continue to contemplate and express themselves throughout their lives. Here are individuals’ messages...

We all have an exterior side that we show to the world and a part that we shield and protect. Art therapy helps individuals connect with, confront, and work with that private/hidden side.

The art samples shown in this volume were submitted for display in one of SMEDA’s public awareness Art Hop exhibits. The artists chose pieces that helped express their cur- rent or past relationship with their eating disorder.


Our next Art Hop exhibition will be in February, 2017. Click here for further details.

Art Therapy: Confronting Our Inner Selves

by Laura Smidchens

Art therapy is often done by specially-trained therapists that adjust the artistic medium to better match the clients and their needs. While some methods allow persons to express them- selves in less permanent forms, such as working in sand basins with figures and other items, other methods provide a more permanent form. Either type of art gives clients a safe way to explore themselves and their relationship to their eating disorder (ED) and the world around them.

Whether looking at their goals and the roots that will help them achieve those goals....

 

Or looking at their relationship with others...

Or their relationship with their ED...

The medium and skill are not as relevant as the insights and the personal gains that are made.

The art samples shown in this volume were submitted for display in one of SMEDA’s public awareness Art Hop exhibits. The artists chose pieces that helped express their current or past relationship with their eating disorder.

Our next Art Hop exhibition is scheduled for February, 2017. Please go to our website for further details.

Click here to download the complete newsletter.

Art Therapy: Creating a Voice

by Laura Smidchens

Art allows individual creators to express themselves. For those individuals that either do not have the words to express themselves or find it too painful to talk openly about something, art gives them a way to explore and express their inner selves. Even simple forms of expression can be packed with meaning that allows the creator to organize and analyze their feelings and reactions... Though even in the apparently simple forms of expression, it is important to look at the details...

Click here to read more and see examples.